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When Miss Turner Fainted

Abdi is a home health aide. Recently, he was visiting his client Miss Turner in her home. Abdi was unpacking some items on the kitchen counter when Miss Turner walked into the kitchen and said, “I don’t feel so well!” She looked pale and suddenly lost consciousness and fainted. The blood supply to her brain temporarily stopped. She became dizzy and fell to the floor.

Abdi ran over to Miss Turner and listened for her breathing. He checked her blood pressure and her pulse, and he checked her head to see if she had hurt herself when she fell. He loosened her shirt to give her more air. He talked calmly to Miss Turner, hoping she would wake up soon.

After a minute, Miss Turner or woke up. She was a little confused, but Abdi assured her she was okay and that she was in her kitchen. “Did you forget your breakfast this morning, Miss Turner?” he asked.

“I think I did!” she said. “That’s why I felt weak.”

People can faint from low blood sugar, from being dehydrated, or from becoming too hot. They can faint from a lot of stress.

“You’re all right now, Miss Turner,” Abdi said. “I’ll help you to the chair, and then I’ll fix you some breakfast, okay?”

After Miss Turner fainted, Abdi called his supervisor and Miss Turner’s doctor to let them know about what happened. Her doctor will make sure that Miss Turner didn’t faint from her medication. Abdi documented what happened in her file and will also try to make sure Miss Turner doesn’t forget breakfast anymore.

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© 2015 by Southwest Adult Basic Education

Project made financially possible through grants from:

Southwest Initiative Foundation, Marshall Community Foundation, Southwest Regional Transition Partners, Southwest Adult Basic Education, Marshall Healthcare Partners